Category Archives: Wellness Incentives

Harris Study: 91% of Employers Believe a Wellness Program can Reduce Health Care Costs and Lead to Healthier Lifestyles

According to a 2008 national survey by Harris Interactive, 91 percent of employers “believed they could reduce their health care costs by influencing employees to adopt healthier lifestyles,” wrote two Harvard School of Public Health  (HSPH) experts in the July 10, 2008 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. Michelle Mello, a professor of law and public health in the Department of Health Policy and Management, and colleague Meredith B. Rosenthal, an HSPH associate professor of health economics and health policy, spelled out the legal parameters of employer-sponsored wellness programs as they stand today. This Harvard report can be viewed here.

According to surveys cited by Mello and Rosenthal, 19 percent of employers with 500 or more employees offered wellness programs, as of 2006. Almost 40 percent said they planned to offer rewards for healthy behaviors within two years.

Wellness incentive Programs are one of the fastest growing trends in corporate America. What is keeping you from implementing a corporate wellness program today?

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Robert Piller is President of GeekTechBranding.com, the leader in promotional products aimed at a tech audience. Since 1981, Robert Piller has worked with Fortune 500 companies, as well as startups and other organizations to market and promote their businesses using the latest and most cost-effective marketing strategies and incentives.

He is a frequent writer and speaker on marketing topics and loves to share and exchange ideas. He can be reached through LinkedIn, Twitter, by email (robert [at] geektechbranding.com) or through this blog

GeekTechBranding.com offers the latest hi-tech promotional products –including imprinted speakers and ear buds, tablet and cell phone cases and bags, promotional stylus pens, imprinted chargers, USB drives and hubs and more — all imprinted with your company’s name and logo.

Harris Study: 91% Of Employers Believe A Wellness Program Can Reduce Health Care Costs And Lead To Healthier Lifestyles

can a wellness incentive program reduce healthcare costs?According to a 2008 national survey by Harris Interactive, 91 percent of employers “believed they could reduce their health care costs by influencing employees to adopt healthier lifestyles,” wrote two Harvard School of Public Health  (HSPH) experts in the July 10, 2008 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. Michelle Mello, a professor of law and public health in the Department of Health Policy and Management, and colleague Meredith B. Rosenthal, an HSPH associate professor of health economics and health policy, spelled out the legal parameters of employer-sponsored wellness programs as they stand today. This Harvard report can be viewed here.

According to surveys cited by Mello and Rosenthal, 19 percent of employers with 500 or more employees offered wellness programs, as of 2006. Almost 40 percent said they planned to offer rewards for healthy behaviors within two years.

Wellness Incentive Programs are one of the fastest growing trends in corporate America.

What is keeping you from implementing a corporate wellness program today?

—————————————

Robert Piller is President of GeekTechBranding.com, the leader in promotional products aimed at a tech audience. Since 1981, Robert Piller has worked with Fortune 500 companies, as well as startups and other organizations to market and promote their businesses using the latest and most cost-effective marketing strategies and incentives.

He is a frequent writer and speaker on marketing topics and loves to share and exchange ideas. He can be reached through LinkedIn, Twitter, by email (robert [at] geektechbranding.com) or through this blog

GeekTechBranding.com offers the latest hi-tech promotional products –including imprinted speakers and ear buds, tablet and cell phone cases and bags, promotional stylus pens, imprinted chargers, USB drives and hubs and more — all imprinted with your company’s name and logo.